City History

 

 

About the City of Quitman

 

The City of Quitman was founded in 1850. Originally a pioneer town, it was established as the County Seat of Wood County.

 

Quitman was incorporated in Texas as a "Type A General Law City" in 1941.

 

Historical accounts relate that Quitman received its name from John A. Quitman, who was a prominent figure in the Mexican - American War in 1846 -1847. After the fall of Mexico City, US Army General Winfield Scott named John A. Quitman as the Military Governor of Mexico City for the remainder of the US occupation. He was the only American to rule from within the National Palace. John A Quitman went on to be a Governor of Mississippi in 1850 -1851.

 

 

 

Originally, agriculture served as the principal economic motivator of the area with Quitman serving as the center for farmers of the area.  But, as was the case with many rural communities, the Great Depression brought a severe economic decline to this community as well as a decline in the population.

During World War II oil was discovered in the area and boosted the local economy. During the last few decades of last century, the creation of nearby recreational lakes added to the area's economic vitality and overall populous.

 

Mirroring the economic pattern of the Great Depression and World War II, Quitman experienced a decline in population during the first years of the new Century.

 

From 1960-2000, Quitman experienced steady growth with the 2000 Census recording 2,020 people.  The 2010 Census shows the population to be 1,809.

Quitmans leadership is getting ready to start the major project of giving our city a long overdue facelift and are looking forward to the future and growth of Quitman.

 
The first brick courthouse in Wood County at the county seat of Quitman was finished in late 1883 and used until it burned in1925.